RYERSON LAW – Winter 2021 Lecturer Job Posting (DEADLINE: November 13, 2020)

Ryerson Law School’s Co-teaching Model: Co-teaching at the Faculty of Law involves two
instructors working together to deliver a course: there is a lecturer instructor and a practitioner
instructor. The lecturer instructor is usually responsible for delivering three hours of lecture to a
class per week. The practitioner instructor is focused on the Integrated Practice Lab for that
course.

The practitioner provides students with training on skills, tasks, and assessments required from
Ontario’s Integrated Law Practice Program. Practitioners will be working with a Ryerson faculty
member in the relevant course to co-develop the learning materials and assessments and to
determine the best mode of delivery. Examples of training include interviewing clients,
undertaking negotiations, managing a legal practice, preparing solicitor documents, or preparing
documents for litigation. Co-teaching is designed to provide Ryerson law students with the
opportunity to learn fundamental practice skills from practitioners.

Practitioners from all relevant practice areas are encouraged to apply. Applications are welcome
from the following non-exclusive list of practitioners: lawyers in private practice (sole
practitioner, small or large firms), in-house counsel (including lawyers working with non-profit
organizations), government lawyers, and members of the judiciary.

 

APPLICANT’S RESPONSIBILITIES:
– In their cover letter, applicants should give examples of what kind of assignments they would design
to teach practice skills in the Integrated Practice Lab.
– In addition, applicants who wish to apply for these postings must provide an application including the
following information referred to in Article 14.9 of the current CUPE 3904 Unit 1 collective agreement
https://www.ryerson.ca/hr/collective-agreements/.
1. Attach one file with a cover letter and an updated resume (including minimum academic
qualifications and any other relevant information concerning the applicant’s candidacy – such
information will also include the applicant’s current e-mail address).
2. Indicate which of the posted course(s) and section(s) the applicant is applying for and qualified to
teach.
3. Indicate the applicant’s preferred type of appointment (e.g. part-time hourly).

 

The following work is available for Winter 2021.

(PLEASE NOTE: The delivery of these courses may be online, in-person or hybrid, and successful applicants must have access to the appropriate technology e.g. computer and internet)

Main Lecturer section

1) JUR 105 Foundations of Law and Legal Methods

Course Description: This course introduces students to foundational and influential theories of law (e.g. positivism, natural law, legal realism, law and economics, and critical perspectives: feminist theory, critical race theory and critical legal studies) as well as to effective communication and application of research results through a variety of written and oral communication and dispute resolution tools.

Hours per section

Three hours per week. Applicants must be available to deliver a two-hour lecture and a one-hour lecture and to work with the
practitioner delivering the Integrated Practice Lab.

Expected Enrolment/Section

30 students per section

 

2) JUR 106 Criminal Law

Course Description: Criminal law attempts to balance societal protection and the rights of the accused in both national and international settings. This course deals with the principles and processes of criminal defence and prosecution. Students learn and/or experience bail hearing, preliminary inquiries, judicial conferences, disclosure and jury selection. There is a focus on issues related to equity, diversity and inclusion in the criminal justice system, particularly the intersection of criminal law with Indigenous culture.

Hours per section

Three hours per week. Applicants must be available to deliver a two-hour lecture and a one-hour lecture and to work with the
practitioner delivering the Integrated Practice Lab.

Expected Enrolment/Section

60 students per section

 

3) JUR 108 Administrative and Regulatory Law

Course Description: Issues in administrative law and regulatory law are commonly encountered, due to their influence on everyday interactions between individuals and government entities. Regulatory law covers delegated rule-making, policy development and adjudication. Students learn about regulatory practice and principles of judicial review, as well as how to provide advice to individuals and corporations on complex rules, regulations, procedures, permitting, applications and enforcement. The role of the compliance function and rise of “RegTech” are also explored.

Hours per section

Three hours per week. Applicants must be available to deliver a two-hour lecture and a one-hour lecture and to work with the
practitioner delivering the Integrated Practice Lab.

Expected Enrolment/Section

60 students per section

 

4) JUR 106 Criminal Law

Course Description: Criminal law attempts to balance societal protection and the rights of the accused in both national and international settings. This course deals with the principles and processes of criminal defence and prosecution. Students learn and/or experience bail hearing, preliminary inquiries, judicial conferences, disclosure and jury selection. There is a focus on issues related to equity, diversity and inclusion in the criminal justice system, particularly the intersection of criminal law with Indigenous culture.

Hours per section

Three hours per week. Applicants must be available to deliver a two-hour lecture and a one-hour lecture and to work with the
practitioner delivering the Integrated Practice Lab.

Expected Enrolment/Section

60 students per section

Co-Teacher/Integrated Practice Lab

1) JUR 106 Criminal Law

Course Description: Criminal law attempts to balance societal protection and the rights of the accused in both national and international settings. This course deals with the principles and processes of criminal defence and prosecution. Students learn and/or experience bail hearing, preliminary inquiries, judicial conferences, disclosure and jury selection. There is a focus on issues related to equity, diversity and inclusion in the criminal justice system, particularly the intersection of criminal law with Indigenous culture.

Number of sessions: 2

Hours per section

For each section applied for: Two one-hour sessions per week. Applicant must be available to potentially teach on two different days each week

Expected Enrolment/Section

For each section applied for: 60 students (divided into two classes of 30 students)

 

2) JUR 107 Constitutional Law

Course Description: Constitutional law is the supreme law of the nation state and the authority with which other laws and
government actors must comply. Students learn about the powers and responsibilities of different levels and types of government as well as protecting and guaranteeing the rights of legal persons. Students have opportunities to work with ministerial briefs, governmental memoranda, factums and pleadings for landmark constitutional litigation cases, including Indigenous land claims, historical wrongs and competing rights

Number of sessions: 2

Hours per section

For each section applied for: Two one-hour sessions per week. Applicant must be available to potentially teach on two different days each week

Expected Enrolment/Section

For each section applied for: 60 students (divided into two classes of 30 students)

 

3) JUR 108 Administrative and Regulatory Law

Course Description: Issues in administrative law and regulatory law are commonly encountered, due to their influence on everyday interactions between individuals and government entities. Regulatory law covers delegated rule-making, policy development and adjudication. Students learn about regulatory practice and principles of judicial review, as well as how to
provide advice to individuals and corporations on complex rules, regulations, procedures, permitting, applications and
enforcement. The role of the compliance function and rise of “RegTech” are also explored.

Number of sessions: 2

Hours per section

For each section applied for: Two one-hour sessions per week. Applicant must be available to potentially teach on two different days each week

Expected Enrolment/Section

For each section applied for: 60 students (divided into two classes of 30 students)

 

4) JUR 109 Indigenous Law in Canada

Course Description: This course highlights the impact of Canadian laws on Indigenous peoples, including their complex
relationship with Canada’s constitution. Traditional Indigenous legal systems and customs, and how these are practised in a
modern context, are studied, along with the legal struggles of First Nations, Inuit and Metis within federal, provincial and
territorial contexts. Students examine relevant legislation, regulations and case law and gain experience with by-law making, impact benefit agreements, revenue sharing agreements, and ownership structures.

Number of sessions: 2

Hours per section

For each section applied for: Two one-hour sessions per week. Applicant must be available to potentially teach on two different days each week

Expected Enrolment/Section

For each section applied for: 60 students (divided into two classes of 30 students)

 

TYPES OF APPOINTMENTS:
The following are examples of the types of appointments for which candidates may apply (further details and types in Article 16 of the CUPE 3904 Unit 1 Collective Agreement).
(a) A part-time hourly appointment/one semester is for less than 9 semester hours in any one semester
(b) A reduced workload half sessional appointment, for at least 9 but less than 15 semester hours in any one semester
(c) A full workload half sessional appointment, normally for 15 semester hours in any one semester

 

Qualifications:
Minimum Requirement: Applicants must possess a JD, LLB, or BCL.
Evaluation Scale:
Education: 5 points *
Experience: 40 points
Currency: 20 points
Teaching Skills: 20 points
Interactive skills: 15 points

* Refers to education beyond the minimum requirement.

A minimum of 50 points is required for the applicant to be hired. Explanation of rating scale categories: (based upon CUPE 3904 Unit 1 Collective Agreement)

Education:
● the level of relevant academic degrees including credentials and professional designations, as applicable; and/or degrees typically held by a teacher in that discipline/profession in the university sector

Experience:
● the extent and variety of relevant work and/or community experience in the professional field or discipline
● The extent of university teaching experience
● Previous experience teaching the same or an equivalent course at Ryerson, or an equivalent course at another university

Currency
● demonstrated evidence of having maintained up-to-date knowledge (including practice skills, where appropriate) in their specific field/discipline – and/or demonstrated evidence of having maintained academic currency in the specific field/discipline relevant to the course (s) for which the candidate has applied which may include publication in a peer reviewed journal, presentation or attendance at relevant academic conferences. Attendance/participation in teaching related conferences (e.g. Ryerson Learning and Teaching Conference), workshops, seminars, etc.

Teaching Skills
● Ability to teach effectively which may include such tools as Contract Lecturer Assessment forms and Faculty Course Survey results or equivalent documentation;
● Demonstrated experience of ability to effectively teach in an online environment which includes demonstrated knowledge of best practices for the delivery and management of online courses, including using course management system tools to communicate with students and to foster and support a collaborative online learning community with and between students in the course.
● Applicants must demonstrate proficiency in all aspects of personal computers that are relevant to this course, including document creation, file management, internet research, and communications.

Interactive Skills
● Demonstrated ability to interact effectively with colleagues and students; ability to work effectively in groups; ability to resolve conflicts constructively; ability to carry out the duties and obligations of a Contract Lecturer in a respectful manner; ability to empathize with others and consider varied perspectives.

COMMITMENT TO DIVERSITY:
Ryerson University is strongly committed to fostering diversity within our community. We welcome those who would contribute to the further diversification of our staff, our faculty and its scholarship including, but not limited to, women, visible minorities, Aboriginal people, persons with disabilities, and persons of any sexual orientation or gender identity. Please note that all qualified candidates are encouraged to apply but applications from Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

Next steps:
Applications are done online via Ryerson’s Careers page found here
https://www.ryerson.ca/careers/search-available-career-opportunities/

1. If you are currently employed at Ryerson, you select “I am an internal candidate” and log in with your Ryerson credentials.
2. If you are not currently employed at Ryerson, you would select ‘I am an external candidate’ Ryerson and create your profile and click ‘Apply without selecting a job’.

More details on how to create a profile and submit your application is also available here
https://www.ryerson.ca/hr/learning-workshops/how-to-eHR/careers/

The Job Opening ID# 354831 and the deadline to apply is no later than 4pm on Friday November 13, 2020.

Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions.
Regards,
Erika Ellis Buchanan
Academic Administrative Coordinator
Faculty of Law, Ryerson University
Email: erika.ellisbuchanan@ryerson.ca